3 Reasons why your child needs to learn to code. Like, now.

Computer science is foundational.

To be a child in the digital era is to be surrounded by technology nearly every second of the day. 95% of Americans own a cellphone, 77% go online at least once a day, and 79% have a computer at home.

With technology and the internet being such an integral part of daily life, children benefit from seeing how it all works at a fundamental level. Just like learning about electricity, the water cycle, or the human brain, computer science provides children with a basic understanding of something they interact with on a daily basis. Kids that have the chance to learn how their favorite apps are built, what parts make up a computer, and how the internet works walk away with a better understanding of the world around them.

Coding isn’t just for “left brainers.” It’s for everyone.

When you think of a programmer, most people usually jump to an image of nerdy guys in a dark room, solving math problems and staring at binary flashing on a screen. This isn’t the case, but it still leads some people to assume programming isn’t right for them — or their child — before they even get a chance to explore it.

Computer science and creativity go hand in hand — more than you might think. When asked in a survey by Change The Equation, high schoolers said they liked classes in art and design, performing arts, and computer science the most. Like color theory or vocal warm ups, programming is just another tool that allows kids to express themselves in any way they choose.

Computer science crosses every discipline.

At the end of the day, programming is a skill, not just a career path. Even if your child isn’t interested in going into a STEM field, computer science gives them foundational knowledge that’s valuable and needed in every industry.

Artists need websites to showcase their work. Doctors need algorithms to reduce human error and save lives. Architects need design software. Chances are, if you can name a job, there’s a way computer science has impacted it.


That’s great and all, but…

The education system hasn’t quite caught up, yet. Code.org found that although 91% of parents wanted their child to learn computer science, only 35% of U.S. schools offered classes in it.

We’re here to change that. Codecraft Works offers summer camps, homeschool labs, after-school clubs, and online courses that encourage students to explore computer science creatively and at their own pace. To get your child started with programming, visit codecraftworks.com to learn more.